ENERGY EFFICIENT LIGHTING

Light your home using the same amount of light for less money.

Replacing your home’s five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED lightbulbs are available today. For high-quality products with the greatest energy savings, choose bulbs that have earned the ENERGY STAR.Read More

What Are My Lighting Choices?

HALOGEN INCANDESCENTS

Halogen incandescents have a capsule inside that holds gas around a filament to increase bulb efficiency. They are available in a wide range of shapes and colors, and they can be used with dimmers. Halogen incandescent bulbs meet the federal minimum energy efficiency standard, but there are now many more efficient options to meet your lighting needs.

CFL’S

Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) are simply curly versions of the long tube fluorescent lights you may already have in a kitchen or garage. Because they use less electricity than traditional incandescents, typical CFLs can pay for themselves in less than nine months, and then start saving you money each month. An ENERGY STAR-qualified CFL uses about one-fourth the energy and lasts ten times longer than a comparable traditional incandescent bulb that puts out the same amount of light. A CFL uses about one-third the energy of a halogen incandescent. Read More

LED’s

Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are a type of solid-state lighting — semiconductors that convert electricity into light. Although once known mainly for indicator and traffic lights, LED’s in white light, general illumination applications are one of today’s most energy-efficient and rapidly-developing technologies.ENERGY STAR-qualified LED’s use only 20%–25% of the energy and last up to 25 times longer than the traditional incandescent bulbs they replace. LED’s use 25%–30% of the energy and last 8 to 25 times longer than halogen incandescents.

LED bulbs are currently available in many products such as replacements for 40W, 60W, and 75W traditional incandescents, reflector bulbs often used in recessed fixtures, and small track lights. While LED’s are more expensive at this early stage, they still save money because they last a long time and have very low energy use. As with other electronics, prices are expected to come down as more products enter the market.

Buying the Perfect Energy-Efficient Light Bulb in 5 Easy Steps

Step 1: ENERGY STAR Means Energy Savings

First look for the ENERGY STAR label. It means that the bulb you’re selecting is certified to save energy. ENERGY STAR bulbs are available in all shapes and sizes, and some are even dimmable.

Step 2 Location, Location, Location

Ask yourself, where is this light bulb going? A table or floor lamp? A ceiling fixture? The following chart can help you pick the best bulb for each fixture.

Step 3 Lumens Not Watts

Next, look for lumens on the Lighting Facts Label. Since you are buying an energy-efficient bulb, you have to look for lumens rather than watts to discover how bright your bulb will be. Watts indicate energy consumed and  … Read More

Step 4 Mood Lighting

You’re almost there, but first you have to pick your color. Energy-efficient bulbs now come in a range of colors. The light appearance (color) is displayed on the Lighting Facts Label as a number on the Kelvin (K) scale. Read More

Step 5 Buy It, Install It, Enjoy It

You are ready to go. You’ve selected the perfect bulb for your home and you’re ready to save energy. Now you have to fork over the cash, but if you think your perfect bulb is too expensive, think again! The operating cost of an ENERGY STAR CFL is roughly $1.20 a year and Read More